What is reverse osmosis?
Reverse osmosis removes contaminants from unfiltered water when pressure forces it through a semipermeable membrane. Water flows from the more concentrated side (more contaminants) of the RO membrane to the less concentrated side (fewer contaminants) to provide clean drinking water. The fresh water produced is called the permeate. The concentrated water left over is called the waste or brine.
A semipermeable membrane has small pores that block contaminants but allow water molecules to flow through. In osmosis, water becomes more concentrated as it passes through the membrane to obtain equilibrium on both sides. Reverse osmosis, however, blocks contaminants from entering the less concentrated side of the membrane. For example, when pressure is applied to a volume of saltwater during reverse osmosis, the salt is left behind and only clean water flows through. 
How does a reverse osmosis system work?
A reverse osmosis system removes sediment and chlorine from water with a prefilter before it forces water through a semipermeable membrane to remove dissolved solids. After water exits the RO membrane, it passes through a postfilter to polish the drinking water before it enters a dedicated faucet. Reverse osmosis systems have various stages depending on their number of prefilters and postfilters. 
1.When water first enters an RO system, it goes through prefiltration. Prefiltration typically includes a carbon filter and a sediment filter to remove sediment and chlorine that could clog or damage the RO membrane.

2.Next, water goes through the reverse osmosis membrane where dissolved particles, even too small to be seen with an electron microscope, are removed.

3.After filtration, water flows to the storage tank, where it is held until needed. A reverse osmosis system continues to filter water until the storage tank is full and then shuts off.

4.Once you turn on your drinking water faucet, water comes out of the storage tank through another postfilter to polish drinking water before it gets to your faucet.


An RO storage tank holds reverse osmosis water so you have plenty to use when you need it. A reverse osmosis system makes water slowly. It takes one minute to produce two to three ounces of RO water. If you were to turn on your faucet for a glass of water at the actual membrane production rate, then you would have to wait at least 5 minutes for it to fill. With a storage tank, your glass fills instantly.
Reverse osmosis system benefits
A reverse osmosis system is one of the most extensive methods of filtration. It removes 98% of dissolved solids, which makes it healthier to drink. A water distiller is the only other drinking water system that also reduces TDS, but it's less efficient than an RO system. 
1.Harmful dissolved contaminants reduced
2.Sodium reduced
3.Bad tastes and odors reduced
4.More environmentally friendly than bottled water
5.Easy to install and maintain
6.Fits under the kitchen sink

Is reverse osmosis water good for you?
A reverse osmosis water system removes dissolved contaminants that you can't see but that could make you sick. Reverse osmosis does work for your kidneys by filtering water before it enters your body. It also removes beneficial minerals like calcium and magnesium from water, but that does not make reverse osmosis water bad for you.

Our bodies are 70-80% water that hydrates, lubricates joints, and aids organ function. You don’t need minerals to do those things. You would have to drink excessive amounts of water for your body to absorb enough mineral content to make a significant difference. Food is the primary source of essential nutrients, not water. If you want more minerals, eat your fruits and veggies.

Contact Us
Mail Us
sales@kaypeeaquatech.com